Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week: March

Many bird species worldwide have been able to adapt to changing environments and habitats, thriving close to human settlements, many other species however have not been able to adapt. Those unable to adapt are negatively affected by habitat loss and fragmentation, loss of food resources, and changing environmental conditions.

Thank you to all the photographers that submitted photos of birds, your pictures can create awareness about bird life and diversity. Here we present the Top 25 photographs of birds from this week’s theme.

Ashy drongos are distributed across South and Southeast Asia, photographed here in Dandeli, India (Prasanna Bhat)Burrowing owls are found in North and South America, they use open landscapes, and in parts of South America where deforestation occurs they are expanding their range (Sue Liberto)Beautiful photograph of a common stonechat in Nagpur, Maharashtra India (Dr. Pavan Puri)The ruby-topaz hummingbird feeds on nectar and small insects, the males defend their territories aggressively, they are found in gardens and cultivations in the Lesser Antilles and tropical northern South America (Michiel Oversteegen)Himalayan Monal in the snow photographed in Chopta, Uttarakhand, India (Asim Haldar)Brown pelicans can be found on the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific coasts in the Americas where they are resident, some populations in the northern areas of their range do migrate to some extent (Leslie Reagan)Common green magpies are found in the lower Himalayas in north eastern India, central Thailand, Malaysia, Sumatra, and northwestern Borneo (Dr. Sanjay Solanki)Green heron performing a mating dance in the Central Florida birding trail, USA (Agnish Dey)Indian spotted eagles are found in Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, and Nepal, they use tropical and subtropical dry forest habitats, as well as plantations and arable land (Harshil Sharma)Oriental darters can be found in freshwater lakes and streams in tropical South Asia, and Southeast Asia (Mrinal Sen)The greater racket-tailed drongo breeds in the western Himalayas to the eastern Himalayas, its calls include imitations of other bird calls (Rahul Deshpande)American Oystercatcher foraging for mussels on the pilings of a pier at low tide off the coast of New Jersey, USA (Kelly Hunt)Chilean flickers are found in Argentina and Chile in temperate forests, photographed here in Araucanía Region, Chile (Franco Elgueta Rivera)Common kingfisher photographed in Sattal, India (Ashish Singh)Secretary birds are endemic to Africa in the grasslands and savannas of the sub-Saharan region, they are listed as vulnerable by the IUCN due to disturbance by humans, and burning of grasslands which decreases their prey populations (Christopher Ciccone)Great crested grebes performing a courtship dance in West Sussex, UK (Edwin Godinho)Spotted owlets breed in tropical Asia, in areas where they nest close to human habitation there is sometimes an increase in breeding success due to increased availability of rodents (Sahasrangshu Choudhury)Razorbills live in the subarctic waters of the Atlantic Ocean and are the closest living relative of the great auk. Photographed here in Maine, USA (Anne Harlan)Sharp-shinned hawks survive the harsh winters by visiting homes with multiple bird feeders, photographed here in Republic, Washington, USA (Jola Charlton)Indian paradise flycatchers are native to Asia, but have a wide distribution normally found in thick forests, in winter they spend their time in tropical Asia (Naresh Nani)Spotted wood owl photographed in Singapore (Lilian Sng)Grey-headed canary flycatchers are found in tropical Asia, they use forest habitats and feed on insects, during the non-breeding season they can be found in abandoned plantations and overgrown gardens (Vidjit Vijaysanker)Allen’s hummingbird photographed in Huntington Beach, California, USA (Barbara Wallace)Rose ringed parakeets are native to South Asia and Africa and have been introduced into other areas, in some of these introduced areas they have become invasive often competing for nesting sites with native cavity nesting birds (Vishesh Kamboj)Oriental turtle doves have a wide distribution, they are found in Europe to Japan in well wooded open habitats (Deepak Singla)

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration, and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivering brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out every day to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

Edited by Laurie Johnson, Campaign Manager

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week: Migration

Wildlife

bird photography, birding, birdlife, wildbird

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week: November

2018 is year of the bird, a project launched by National Geographic with the aim of increasing awareness about birds and the threats they face. This year is 100 years since the Migratory Bird Treaty Act was passed, which brought with it increased protection for many bird species. It has also been 100 years since National Geographic magazine published an article that implored sportsmen to trade their rifles for cameras, and to shoot birds through the camera lens instead. This switch, combined with improving technology, and easier access to cameras over the last century has made bird photography more accessible, and has provided new opportunities for bird research and conservation.

Thank you to all the photographers that submitted photos of birds and aspects of their life, your pictures can create awareness about the beauty and diversity of birds worldwide. Here we present the Top 25 photographs of birds and aspects of their life submitted in November.

Great white pelicans fish in the morning and then spend the rest of the day preening and bathing (Rhonda Lane)Mountain bluebird in Republic, Washington, USA (Jola Charlton)Imperial green pigeons are found in forests of tropical southern Asia, they feed on plant materials in tree canopies (Ramesh Aithal)Black kite preening its tail feathers in New Delhi, India (Vivek Sharma)Black-necked storks make use of wetland habitats in South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Oceania, they are listed as near threatened due to threats of drainage, agriculture encroachment, and tree felling within their habitats (Anuj Pokhiryal)Osprey with fish in West Bengal, India (Sandipan Ghosh)Snow geese in Victoriaville, Quebec, Canada, preparing for the fall migration (Tony Campbell)Oriental skylarks are found in southern, central, and eastern Asia, the male breeding display involves flying up into the sky, where he will flutter and sing, and then rapidly descend back to the ground (Manoj Nair)Grey-hooded warbler, photographed in Sattal, Uttarakhand, India (Deepak Singla)Common kingfisher in Rajasthan India. Kingfishers are able to use each eye separately to be able to better spot prey, this is known as monocular vision, while underwater they use both eyes together for binocular vision (Nishant Rana)Eurasian spoonbill flying in Pune, Maharashtra, India (Anvita Paranjpe)Common cranes in India; this species is one of four crane species that are currently not threatened with extinction (Vijay Singh Chandel)Himalayan bulbul showing off its beauty (Hitesh Cahwla)Western marsh harriers are found in Britain, Europe, the Middle East, Central and northern Asia, and some parts of Africa where they make use of wetland habitats (Brij Kishore)Western reef egrets after a territorial fight in Mulky, Karnataka, India (Praveen K Bhat)Wood sandpipers breed in subarctic wetlands across Europe and Asia, they migrate to Africa, Southern Asia, and Australia. They are protected by the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (Nishith Dwivedi)Little owl stretching in Ankara, Turkey (Halit Uzun)Intermediate egrets performing a courtship display in Saltanapur, Haryana, India (Sanjay Solanki)Rufous treepies are native to the Indian subcontinent, they feed on seeds, fruits, invertebrates, small reptiles, and bird eggs and young. They hide their food stores to be eaten later (Subhamoy Das)Greater racket-tailed drongo showing its long tail feathers (Indranil Bhattacharjee)Mandarin ducks are found in East Asia, in the 20th century in Great Britain a large feral population became established from individuals that had escaped collections (Edwin Godinho)Common cuckoo with food in Bangalore, Karnataka, India (Naresh Nani)Portrait of a Malabar grey hornbill, this bird is endemic to the Western Ghats of India and can be found in dense forest habitats (Amit Prasad)Black-winged kites are found in most of sub-Saharan Africa, coastal regions of north-eastern Africa, India, and Sri Lanka, they make use of savanna, grassland, and rocky area habitats (Kishore Bakshi)Blue jays are native to North America, their diet consists of nuts and seeds, soft fruits, and arthropods (Kelly Hunt)

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration, and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivering brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out every day to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

Edited by Laurie Johnson, Campaign Manager

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week: Flocks

Originally posted 2018-11-16 18:11:20.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week: Migration

In the Northern Hemisphere spring is underway and migratory species will be returning to warmer climates to begin breeding in areas where there is more food available.

Thank you to all the photographers that submitted photos of migratory birds, your pictures can create awareness about the variety of birds that migrate. Here we present the Top 25 photographs of migratory birds.

Common kingfishers have a wide distribution across Eurasia and North Africa, tropical populations can be found by rivers and where the rivers freeze over winter these populations will migrate (Lil’tography Lilian Sng)Greater flamingos have a wide distribution, those that breed in Asia migrate to warmer climates over winter (Vishwas Thakker)Indian paradise flycatcher s are found in the Indian Subcontinent, they overwinter in Tropical Asia, but some populations are not migratory (Dr. SS Suresh)Lesser whistling ducks taking off in West Bengal, India (Firdousi Ahmed)The Himalayan bluetail is found in the Himalayas, it is an altitudinal migrant normally found at 3000 – 4000 m, and during winter at 1500 – 2500 m (Siddhartha Mukherjee)Dalmatian pelican flying over the water in Mithapur, Gujarat, India (Chirag Parmar)Bar-headed geese breed in Central Asia near mountain lakes and winter in South Asia, they have fly at high altitudes to get through mountain passes during their migration (Dr. Pavan Puri)The Eurasian marsh harrier is a wide spread winter visitor to India photographed in Bharatpur Bird Sanctuary, India (Deepak Singla)Indigo bunting photographed in Louisiana, USA (Rhonda Lane)The common shelduck breeds in temperate Eurasia and migrates to subtropical areas in winter (Avijit Dutta)Black-tailed godwits breed from Iceland through Europe and some parts of central Asia, they winter in the Indian Subcontinent, Australia, New Zealand, western Europe, and West Africa (Kishore Bakshi)Montagu’s harrier is a winter migrant to the Indian Subcontinent (Shrikanth N Hegde)Black bazas are found in forests of Northeast India, eastern Himalayas, China, and southeast Asia, in some parts of their range they are migratory and travel in large numbers (Senthil Kumar Damodaran)Sandhill cranes are found in North America and extreme north-eastern Siberia, when they migrate they form large groups which forage and roost together (Leslie Reagan)Ruffs breed in northern Eurasia, they winter in southern and western Europe, Africa, southern Asia, and Australia, and flock in their thousands during migration (Aman Sharma)Pied kingfishers are widely distributed across Africa and Asia and they make short distance seasonal movements within their range (Vishesh Kamboj)Inca Terns breed in Peru and Chile on rocky cliffs; photographed in Concon, Chile (Jorge De La Torre Aninat)Painted buntings are part of the cardinal family and are found in North America, they winter in South Florida, Cuba, the Bahamas, along both coasts of Mexico, and Central America (Agnish Dey)Pallas’s gulls breed from southern Russia to Mongolia and winter in the eastern Mediterranean, Arabia and India (Edwin Godinho)Great white pelicans breed from southeastern Europe, through Asia and Africa; the populations breeding in the Palearctic regions are migrants while those in Africa are resident (Chinmaya Kumar Barik)Snow geese breed n Greenland, Canada, Alaska, and the north-eastern tip of Siberia, and they winter in the warm part of North America (Kelly Hunt)Calliope hummingbirds are native to the United States and Canada where they breed, and in winter they can be found in the deserts and semi-desert regions of Central America (Jola Charlton)Pied harrier photographed In Baruipur, West Bengal, India (Ratul Das)The common hawk-cuckoo is resident in the Indian Subcontinent, some birds winter in Sri Lanka, they are brood parasites of babblers and laughing thrushes (Panthera Tigris)Verditer flycatcher photographed in Sattal, Uttarakhand, India (Dr. Sanjay Solanki)

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration, and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivering brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out every day to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

Edited by Laurie Johnson, Campaign Manager

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week: Interactions

Wildlife

bird photography, birding, birdlife, migration, wildbird

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week: Interactions

In nature there are many types of interactions; mutualism where both organisms benefit, competition where both organisms may be negatively affected, commensalism where one benefits and the other is not affected, competition where each organism is affected negatively, and predation/parasitism/herbivory where one species benefits and the other is negatively affected.

Thanks to all the photographers that submitted photos of  birds interactions, your pictures can create awareness about the variety of interactions that birds are involved in. Here we present the Top 25 photographs of bird interactions.

Red-billed magpie attacking a mother monkey and her baby in Chakki mod, Himachal Pradesh, India (Jasvir Faridkot)Bald eagles are able to manoeuvre well in flight, they are opportunistic carnivores with fish as the main part of their diet (Kelly Hunt)Double-crested cormorant with catch in Los Angeles California, USA (Henser Villela)House Crow removing parasites from a bull’s eyes in Uttar pradesh, India (Nishant Rana)House crow attacking a bar headed goose in Bhavnagar, Gujarat, India (Unmesh Jadav)Malabar trogon feeding a fledgling in Thattekkad bird sanctuary, Kerala, India (Suhyb PJ)Glaucous gull and Alaska brown bear during salmon run in Katmai, Alaska, USA (Ellie Kidd)Brown-headed cowbirds are native to subtropical North America, they feed on insects and will follow cattle in order to catch the insects that are stirred up (Sue Liberto)White-throated laughingthrush preening its partner in Sattal, Uttarakhand, India (Dr. Sanjay Solanki)Rufous trreepie perched on a cow, this bird is native to the Indian Subcontinent and feeds mostly in trees on fruit and seeds but it has been observed feeding on ectoparasites of cattle (Vijay Madan)Muscovy duck and chick, these ducks are native to Mexico, Central, and South America, and chicks stay with their mothers for 10-12 weeks (Jola Charlton)Great white pelicans are sociable birds and will often form large flocks (Jaipur Samanvay Bhutani)Tri-coloured blackbird adult going in to feed chick in Lancaster, California, USA (Sue Liberto)Osprey interacts with a crow in West Bengal, India (Shayan Bose)Rufous treepie and greater racket-tailed drongo photographed in Thathekad, India (Senthil Kumar Damodaran)Jungle mynas feed on insects and will often perch on large mammals to feed on their ectoparasites (Subhendu Khanra)Marabou stork stealing meat from a lappet-faced vulture in Serengeti, Tanzania (Edwin Godinho)Sarus cranes admiring each other in Gondia, Maharashtra, India (Indranil Bhattacharjee)Venezuelan troupial with an Aruban whiptail lizard in Moko, Aruba, the Caribbean (Michiel Oversteegen)Jungle myna feeding in on ticks from cattle (Paneendra BA)Common myna feeding on fleas on the Indian rhinoceros (Anirban Roychowdhury)Black-naped terns flying in Singapore (Lil’tography Lilian Sng)Black drongo sitting on Indian gaur in Tadoba Andhari Tiger Reserve, Maharashtra, India (Pavan Puri)Common mynas feed on insects and will opportunistically feed on insects disturbed by cattle (Chirag Parmar)Mother sandhill crane putting her life on the line to save her baby from a young gator in a swampland of central Florida, USA (Agnish Dey)

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration, and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivering brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out every day to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

Edited by Laurie Johnson, Campaign Manager

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week: February

Wildlife

bird photography, birding, birdlife, interactions, wildbird

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week: February

Birds as a group have great variety which makes for wonderful photographs. They are characterised by feathers, lightweight bones, and laying hard-shelled eggs. As a group they are very diverse appearing in varying shapes, sizes, and colours, and are distributed worldwide.

Thanks to all the photographers that submitted bird photos, your pictures can create awareness about the great variety seen in the bird group. Here we present the Top 25 photographs of birds from this week.

Knob-billed ducks are found in Sub-Saharan Africa, Madagascar, south Asia, and extreme southern China, and they feed on vegetation (Ali Javed)Indian roller photographed in Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur, India (Harshil Sharma)A small American Kestrel attacks a much larger crested caracara in Westpunt, Aruba, the Caribbean (Michiel Oversteegen)The brown-hooded parrot breeds from southeastern Mexico to north-western Colombia, it is found in lowland and foothills in forest canopy and edges (Ganesh Rao)Great egret trying to catch a fish in a lake in Nagpur, Maharashtra, India (Indranil Bhattacharjee)The striking colours of the black and orange flycatcher can be seen here, this bird is endemic to the central and southern Western Ghats, the Nilgiris, and Palni hill ranges of southern India (Ravi Muthuswamy)Blue jays are native to North America, they use deciduous and coniferous forest habitats (Kelly Hunt)Close up of a Calliope hummingbird photographed in Republic, Washington, USA (Tim Nicol)Pheasant tailed jacana taking off from the water, photographed in West Bengal, India (Firdousi Ahmed)A ruby-throated hummingbird feeding On the nectar of a flower in Louisiana, USA (Rhonda Lane)Bluethroats breed in Europe and Asia, and winters in north African and the Indian Subcontinent (Chinmaya Barik)Black-naped monarchs are found in southern and south-eastern Asia in thick forests where it feeds on insects (Dr SS Suresh)Himalayan and red vented bulbuls photographed in Nainital, Uttrakhand, India (Hitesh Chaala)Dalmatian pelican feeding in Bharatpur, Rajasthan, India (Dr. Sanjay Solanki)Anna’s hummingbirds are native to the west coast of North America, photographed here in Elizabeth Lake, California, USA (Henser Villela)Himalayan monal photographed at sunset in Chopta Valley, India (Shayan Bose)The emerald dove is a species of pigeon widespread in the tropical and subtropical parts of the Indian Subcontinent and other areas, it is the state bird of the Indian state Tamil Nadu (Deepa Javdekar)The collared aracari breeds from southern Mexico to Panama, and Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela and Costa Rica, they feed on fruits but will also take lizards (Ramesh Aithal)Robin accentors are native to the mountainous regions of Pakistan, India, Bhutan, Nepal, and China (Dhairya Jhaveri)Black crested bulbuls use habitats of dense scrub and forests, and can be found from the Indian Subcontinent to southeast Asia (Ajoy Kumar Dawn)Blue-throated barbet photographed in Bolpur, West Bengal, India (Saikat Das)Close up of a painted stork juvenile in Keoladeo National Park, India (Aman Sharma)Portrait of a sandhill crane in Fairbanks, Alaska, USA (Ellie Kidd)Water rail photographed in detail in Uttar Pradesh, India (Nishant Rana)Green honeycreepers are a forest canopy species from southern Mexico to Brazil (Shrikanth N Hegde)

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration, and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivering brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out every day to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

Edited by Laurie Johnson, Campaign Manager

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week: Raptors 2

Wildlife

bird photography, birding, birdlife, wildbird

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