Top 25 Migratory Wild Birds

Wild Bird Trust presents the Top 25 Migratory Wild Birds. Approximately 40% of the world’s birds migrate, which means there a lot of birds on the move! Migration is primarily a strategy to optimize living conditions by moving to areas which are warmer and have more food. Migrant birds can be especially difficult to conserve as different countries need to cooperate to ensure birds are conserved across their range. Birds are also vulnerable on flyways as they are often hunted en masse. If birds are conserved in their breeding habitat but their wintering habitat is degraded this makes it a sink for the population as a whole. This is why international agreements such as the Convention for the Conservation of Migratory Animals have been put in place- to foster cooperation between countries, allowing birds to be conserved with the big picture in mind.

We hope you enjoy our selection this week and we encourage you to submit image for next week’s Top 25- the theme will be announced on our Facebook page this weekend. You can also have a look at our Twitter and Instagram for regular bird updates!

The Black-tailed Godwit is listed as near-threatened due to various pressures on the population’s breeding grounds in central Eurasia and wintering grounds in Asia, Africa and Australia. These pressures include intensification of agriculture and degradation of wetlands (Asutosh Pal)This Black-headed Bunting was photographed in its wintering range in Bosipota, India (Sujoy Sarkar)In some migratory species there is variation in whether or not a population will migrate. For example Blue-tailed Bee-eaters in south-east Asia migrate south for the winter but Blue-tailed Bee-easters in Australasia do not migrate (Dr S Alagu Ganesh)A White Stork photographed at the Ngorongoro Crater in Tanzania by Sharon TemplinThere are no ringing records to document the migration of Brown-breasted Flycatchers but their distribution changing from south-east Asia in the summer, to India and Sri Linka in the winter, indicate that these birds do migrate (Vishwas Thakker)Migration can be risky, as every now and then a bird will be blown off course and end up somewhere way out of their range. This happened recently to a Citrine Wagtail that was seen in Cape Town, South Africa, they normally overwinter in southern Asia! (Asutosh Pal)Common Hawk-cuckoos are mainly resident across India but populations in the higher latitudes will migrate seasonally (Kanchan Das)A Common Redshank foraging in a mangrove along the Zuari River, India (Kishore Reddy)Eurasian Wrynecks breed in central Asia where they prefer woodland habitats, whereas they prefer more open habitats in their over-wintering ranges in Africa and southern Asia (Ravi Shankar)A Great White Pelican off the coast of Namibia. Most pelicans just spend the winter in Africa but some of them have made it their home year round! (Suranjan Mukherjee)Lesser Redpolls are called irruptive migrants, their migration patterns are irregular and unpredictable, their movements are usually in relation to where food is available (Edwin Godinho)The Western Yellow Wagtail overwinters in India and Africa, in African savanas they are often associated with game animals (Bhargavi Gokarna)The Loggerhead Shrike is migratory within North America. This bird is considered Near-threatened, the reasons for this are not clear but are thought to be linked to the introduction of the West Nile Virus in the late 90s (Jola Charlton)Calliope Hummingbirds breed in north-western North America and spend the winter in Mexico. Ringing records show that these birds often return to the same sites, there is no place like home! (Tim Nicol)A Eurasian Spoonbill foraging in the Dighal Wetlands, India (Vishesh Kamboj)The Mountain Bulbul is what we call at altitudinal migrant, they move to lower altitudes in the winter to escape the cold (Deepak Sharma)A Northern Harrier in its wintering range, in Fremont, California (Sutapa Karmakar)A male Northern Shoveler in flight. This highly migratory species breeds in the northern latitudes in April and May (Vishesh Kamboj)The Peregrine Falcon is one of the world’s most widespread raptors, in the higher latitudes these raptors will migrate south to find more favourable conditions (Nishant Vyas)The Rainbow Bee-eater is native to Australia, they winter in Australasia and breed in southern Australia (Janis Otto)The name Red Knot may seem a little confusing when looking at this grey wader. This bird undergoes an amazing transformation during the breeding season where there plumage changes to a deep rufous colour (Antonis Tsaknakis)Sandhill Cranes breed in Alaska, Canada and Russia, migrating to wetlands and meadows of southern USA and Mexico for the winter (Leslie Reagan)The Siberian Rubythroat breeds in the Taiga forests of Russia (Sujoy Sarkar)This dainty little bird is a Snow Bunting, which breeds in the Arctic and over winters in central North America and Asia (Melissa Penta)The Snowy Owl became well known because of the Harry Potter films which featured a Snowy Owl by the name of Hedwig (Sharon Templin)

Top 25 Wild Waterbirds

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration, and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivering brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out every day to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

Edited by Christie Craig, Campaign Manager

Originally posted 2018-03-09 20:13:02.

Top 25 Wild Bird Brood Parasites

Brood parasites are an incredibly interesting group of birds. Instead of going to the trouble of building their own nests and raising their own young, they out-source these functions to other birds. They will lay their eggs in the nests of other breeding birds and allow them to raise their young on their behalf. They achieve this through a number of adaptations. Some species mimic the colour and shape of the host’s egg. Others have chicks with structures in their mouths which hyper stimulate the parents to feed them. The adult or chick parasite will also often kill the hosts’s chicks or remove the eggs in the nest, thus ensuring that the parasite survives. However hosts are not completely helpless to this attack, hosts have co-evolved behaviours such as abandoning a nest if it is parasitised. However some hosts are capable of raising both their own young and a parasite, without any visible cost.

Here we present 25 of best photographs of brood parasites, enjoy! If you would like to share your photographs with us, you can upload them to the Facebook page with species, location and photographer as the caption. We will announce next week’s theme this coming Sunday.

A female Asian Koel photographed in Bangalore, India. These birds commonly parasitise crows (Paneendra BA)The square-tailed Drongo-cuckoo of south east Asia parasitises babblers mainly, evicting the host’s eggs and young (Soumitra Ghosh)In India the Jacobin Cuckoo is believed to bring the monsoons, this is due to their arrival shortly before the rains begin (Vinayak Yardi)Common Hawk cuckoos parasitise babblers and laughingthrushes, as a result the fledglings call is very similar to that of a babbler (Paneendra BA)The Shiny Cowbird of South America is a generalist brood parasite, they have been recorded parasitising 240 different species (Raymond De Jesús Asencio)A female rufous morph Plaintive Cuckoo photographed in West Bengal, India (Subham Chowdhury)A rufous morph of the female Sunda Cuckoo. These cuckoos are only found on south east Asian islands, this one was photographed in Indonesia (Ananth Ramasamy)The Jacobin Cuckoo is found in India and sub-Saharan Africa. They parasitise various species of babblers across their range as well as bulbuls and fiscals in southern Africa (Dr. S. Alagu Ganesh)Female Brown-headed Cowbirds can lay up to 40 eggs in a season, damaging and removing the hosts eggs as she does (Jola Charlton)The Indian Cuckoo of India and south-east Asia parasitises drongos and shrikes (Mohit Ghatak)This Wood Duck is raising two of her own chicks as well as a Hooded Merganser chick (Teri Franzen)A Jungle Babbler feeds a Jacobin Cuckoo fledgling (Shaurya Shashwat Shukla)Black-billed Cuckoos are capable of building their own nests and raising young but they also occasionally lay in the nests of other birds (Owen Deutsch)Shiny Cowbird chicks do not mimic their host’s chicks but nonetheless their host provisions just as much for them as for their own chicks (Mann Niyati)Common Hawk-cuckoos are typically found in wooded areas, foraging in the tree tops (Radhakrishnan Sadasivam)A newly fledged Brown-headed Cowbird calls for its parents (Jola Charlton)A female Grey-bellied Cuckoo. These cuckoos usually parasitise Common Tailorbirds, the tailorbirds will abandon a parasitised clutch 20% of the time (Vishal Monakar)Male Pin-tailed Whydahs aggressively protect their territory, chasing away any other birds (Leslie Reagan)The colour of the Plaintive Cuckoos eggs depend on which host they use (Asutosh Pal)In India the Banded Bay Cuckoo parasitises the Common Iora (Panthera Tigris)An Asian Koel photographed at Hebbal Lake, India by Ravishankar PSeveral Chestnut-winged Cuckoos may be raised out of a single host’s nest, this would certainly place an additional burden on these parents (Subham Chowdhury)There are often massive size differences between parasitises and their hosts, such as this Common Cuckoo being fed by a Meadow Pipit in Ireland (Nigel Moore)A Common Hawk Cuckoo photographed in Sultanpur National Park, India (Vishal Monakar)On the third or fourth day after hatching, the Indian cuckoo chick pushes any other eggs and chicks out of the nest (Subham Chowdhury)

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration, and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivering brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out every day to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

Edited by Christie Craig, Campaign Manager

Wild Birds of the Night

Originally posted 2018-04-06 18:53:41.

Top 25 Wild Birds Against Spectacular Landscapes

Wild Bird Trust presents this week’s Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs Against Spectacular Landscapes. We were truly blown away by the amazing landscape and habitat shots that were submitted this week!  Birds are excellent indicators of habitat quality, when habitats are degraded only the generalist and opportunistic species will remain in the area, others will move elsewhere. But when habitats are intact and undisturbed, specialist and sensitive species flourish and there will generally be a greater diversity of birds too. When we value birds and work to conserve them, these beautiful landscapes remain intact too!

To be in the running for next week’s Top 25 you can submit photographs on the Facebook page with species, location, and photographer as the caption. Also follow us on Twitter and Instagram for even more amazing bird photographs. If you would like to receive the Top 25 in your inbox every week, all you need to do is subscribe to our newsletter via our website!

American Kestrels perched alongside the Andes mountains of Ecuador (Melissa Penta)Bar-headed Geese eat a wide variety of aquatic vegetation, they are even able to eat plants that are considered poisonous, such as Lily of the Valley plants. This spectacular photograph was shot at the Tso Moriri lake in India (Ria Mukherjee)A pair of Common Cranes take flight on the arid plains of Little Rann of Kutch, India (Soumitra Ghosh)A study has shown that the diet of Eurasian Curlews differs between males and females. In France males were documented to eat crabs mostly and females preferred bivalves (Christian Bagnol)A Common Stonechat in Assam, India. These stonechats usually hunt insects from perches, frequently favouring one particular perch (Ashish Malhotra)A group of Greater Flamingoes take flight at sunset in Little Rann of Kutch, India (Rupa Mitra)A Greater Spotted Eagle photographed at the Al Khor Wildlife Sanctuary, UAE. These eagles are considered vulnerable to extinction mainly due to their wetland, forest and meadow habitat being degraded (Jobin J Valiyaparambil)A Grey Crowned Crane scans the landscape at Lake Victoria in Uganda (Elaine Henley)The Grey Heron is fairly common across Africa, and much of Eurasia, largely because they are able to use a wide variety of habitats, using any shallow waterbody available (Satyajit Ganguly)A Northern House Martin skims the water on a river in Scotland. These birds breed on buildings and rock faces in Europe and western Asia (David Main)A Common Kestrel scouts the landscape from atop a dune in the United Arab Emirates (Jobin J Valiyaparambil)The Black-rumped Flameback specialises in eating ants and are known to break into the nests of Weaver Ants- a type of ant that makes nests out of kitting together leaves (Anil Goyal)Red-crested Pochards in flight against the backdrop of the Himalayas (Anirban Roychowdhury)A Lilac-breasted Roller perched above the plains of the Maasai Mara, looking for prey (Ganesh Rao)A Little Egret flying over the Sea of Galilee in Israel. Contrary to what the name suggests, the sea of Galilee is a freshwater lake, ideal habitat for these egrets (John Parkinson)A Northern Pintail takes flight in Mangalajodi, India (Giridhar Vijay)A congregation of Northern Shovelers and Spot-billed Ducks in Pune, India (Anvita Paranjpe)A Common Ostrich photographed in Kenya by Ganesh Rao. In wetter areas these birds are quite sedentary but in arid areas they will move great distances to find food and waterA group of Painted Storks stands along the Chambal River, India (Ashok Appu)A Chukar Partridge photographed in Ladakh, India, these partridges are distributed across central Asia, they also have a thriving feral population on Robben Island, a small island off the coast of South Africa (Ria Mukherjee)Two Atlantic Puffins survey the landscape on Skomer Island, Wales (Suranjan Mukherjee)A Black-necked Stork photographed in the Kaziranga National Park, India. These birds prefer undisturbed wetland habitat, and protected areas like these are important for this species (Ahan Roy Chowdhury)A White stork crosses the skies against a magnificent backdrop of the mountains of the Sinai Desert, Egypt (Carlo Galliani)A White-fronted Chat on a beautifully lichened rock in Tasmania, Australia (Radhakrishnan Sadasivam)Eurasian Oystercatchers fly out to sea, off the coast of England. The population of Eurasian Oystercatchers is declining, largely because they have to compete with fishing vessels for food (Suranjan Mukherjee)

To be in the running for next week’s Top 25 you can submit photographs on the Facebook page with species, location, and photographer as the caption. Also follow us on Twitter and Instagram for even more amazing bird photographs. If you would like to receive the Top 25 in your inbox every week, all you need to do is subscribe to our newsletter via our website! 

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration, and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivering brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out every day to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

Edited by Christie Craig, Campaign Manager

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #124

Originally posted 2018-02-02 20:06:52.

The Best of the Top 25: Part 1

Over the past year we have received thousands of bird photographs from around the globe. This has been an amazing journey in discovering the amazing variety of birdlife that our world has to offer. This week we take a step back to appreciate some of the best of the Top 25. We hope you enjoy this trip down memory lane! Thank you for everyone who tirelessly contributes to the Top 25 every week, your photographs bring the beauty of the avian world to us all!

This beautiful Allen’s Hummingbird was featured in our 87th Top 25. They breed on the west coast of the USA and over-winter in Mexico (Teri Franzen)Like many of the world’s vultures, this Andean Condor is near-threatened, mainly due to poisoning. Captive breeding programs are in place to boost the population (Ricardo Varela‎)The Blue Jay is common across their range in the USA, this one was photographed in New York’s central Park by Shu-To ChiouThese beautiful Blue-cheeked Bee-eaters were featured in our 80th Top 25 Wild Birds (Teri Franzen)A stunning technicolour Blue-throated Barbet featured in our 79th Top 25 (Dilip Gupta)Brown-headed Parrots are distributed from here in the Kruger National Park, south africa up to east Africa (Jay van Rensburg)A colony of Cape Gannets on one of their breeding sites, Bird Island, off the coast of South Africa (John Vosloo)The Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo is endangered as it’s forest habitat is cleared for agriculture. This is compounded with the fact that they occupy a very small range on the west coast of Australia (Ashvij Putta)Citrine Wagtails eat insects mainly, they are closely associated with wet areas where insects are plentiful (Arindam Halder)The Common Tailorbird belongs to the same family as the cisticolas. they are typically seen flitting through bushy vegetation looking for insects (Debarpan Dutta)A magnificent shot of King Penguins along the coast of South Georgia (David Berliner)This Olive Woodpecker was featured in our 82nd Top 25. This bird was spotted in Port Alfred, South Africa by Tim Cockcroft‎Elegant Terns are distributed along the western coast of the Americas (Salah Baazizi)A Common Hoopoe takes a dust bath at sunset (Dhirtiman Hore)The Grey-headed Fish-eagle of southern Asia eats almost exclusively fish (Mainak Das)This beautiful portrait of a Griffon Vulture was featured in our 81st Top 25 (Nitin Madan)An amazing capture of a Peregrine Falcon coming in to land (Leslie Reagan)This Plate-billed Mountain-toucan has a very limited distribution, found in a thin strip of montane forest in Colombia and Ecuador (Alejandro Gonzalez T)‎The Red and Green Macaw disappeared from Argentina years ago but thanks to a reintroduction program, the species occurs here once again (Hymakar Valluri)The Red-bearded Bee-eater occurs in south-east Asia, although it is now absent from parts of its range due to forest being replaced with palm and rubber plantations (Jay S)A beautiful Red-winged Laughingthrush photographed in China by Jay ShahA close up of a critically endangered Red-headed Vulture. This species was heavily impacted by the veterinary drug diclofenac, which proved to be poisonous to vulture who ate carcasses with traces of the drug. The drug has since been banned but other threats are present (Suranjan Mukherjee)This Turquoise-browed Motmot from central America forms strong bonds with its mate and the same pair will often mate for many years in a row (William Steele)This White-winged Redstart was featured in our 139th Top 25! This stunning bird was photographed in Pakistan by Tahir Abbas AwanThis White-throated Sparrow of North America has a particular liking for the secondary growth habitats that springs up after a fire or logging (Janelle Peters Pitula)

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration, and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivering brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out every day to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

Edited by Christie Craig, Campaign Manager

https://blog.nationalgeographic.org/2018/05/03/top-25-woodland-birds/ ‎

Top 25 Wild Waterbirds

Wild Bird Trust presents the Top 25 Wild Waterbirds. Waterbirds can be particularly rewarding to photograph as waterbodies like wetlands and estuaries attract so many different species. In the past wetlands and marshes were often seen as wastelands that should be drained or transformed, but now we are recognising the value of these areas to birds and other wildlife. Wetlands not only support wildlife but also function as the ‘kidneys’ of our ecosystems, filtering and cleaning water that comes into them. They also protect humans by buffering floods and stabilising shorelines. Unfortunately our oceans, rivers, wetlands and estuaries are under threat from pollutants like pesticides and plastics as well as disturbance from humans. The good news is we can all play a part in protecting our waterways. We can pick up litter, reduce our plastic consumption and ensure that we discard of chemicals in a responsible way. If we all make these small changes, the positive impact on our waterways could be immense!

If you would like to submit photographs for our Top 25 contest next week, keep a eye on the Facebook page, the next theme will be announced on Sunday. Then you can simply submit your photograph to the Facebook page with species, location and photographer as the caption, good luck!

The African Jacana has a polyandrous breeding system, where females mate with multiple males and the males care for the young (Edwin Godinho)The Great Cormorant is the most widespread cormorant species, they are found from the arctic regions to the tropics (Soumitra Ghosh)The American Dipper lives along fast flowing mountain streams, here they prey upon aquatic invertebrates and small fish (Melissa Penta)A stunning habitat shot of Northern Pintails in Odisha, India (Subhamoy Das)this Baillon’s Crake and its perfectly captured reflection was photographed in Rajarhat, India (Shayan Bose)The Black-legged Kittiwake is one of the most abundant gulls in the North Atlantic. However their population is decreasing due to climate change. as sea temperatures rise, their zooplankton prey are affected which in turn reduces the gulls breeding success (Judi Fenson)Crab Plovers catch crabs by stabbing them with their bills open (Vishwas Thakker)Two Double-crested Cormorants with fish prey in San Fernando Valley, California (Leslie Reagan)The Eurasian Spoonbill breeds in central Eurasia and over-winters in southern Asia and northern Africa. there is also a resident population in India, like this one at the Dighal Wetlands (Vishesh Kamboj)Ferruginous Ducks are Near-threatened because their habitats are being polluted and disturbed by humans (Amit Kumar Srivastava)The Glossy Ibis uses shallow lakes and lagoons but they are also partial to ricefields, ricefields have allowed the population to expand their range in the Mediterranean (Kuntal Das)A trio of Great Cormorants in Bhavnagar, India (Unmesh Jadav)Greylag Geese form long term monogamous bonds, one pair was recorded together for 17 years! (Gaurav Budhiraja)The Large-billed Tern of South America makes use of freshwater rivers and lakes (Sharon Templin)A group of Lesser Flamingoes feeding in Surat, India. One of the main characteristics that distinguishes the Lesser from the Greater Flamingo is the colour of the bill, the Lesser Flamingoes have a much darker bill (Mukesh Mishra)The Mandarin Duck is native to eastern Asia but they have been introduced and have established multiple feral populations, including this one in California (Sandeep Nagaraja)Two Mute Swans on the Frozen over Staring Lake, USA (Deepak Sharma)Ringing records show that Northern Pintails can live up to 15 years (Asutosh Pal)Ruddy Turnstones experience two extremes every year. They breed in the sub-Arctic regions and then migrate to much warmer coastlines like Australia and Africa (Ashvij Putta)The name ruff, comes from the elaborate breeding plumage of the males which resemble the ruffs that were worn in the 17th century. This ruff is out of breeding plumage, quite drab in comparison (Asutosh Pal)A Mute Swan takes flight in France (Christian Bagnol)A Terek Sandpiper photographed on the coast of Perth, Australia (Ashvij Putta)When Ruddy Shelducks breed, the young of different broods will frequently join together, perhaps to keep safe? (Sayan Biswas Maitra)A Western Grebe photographed in Fremont, California (Sutapa Karmakar)Wood Sandpipers are monogamous but care of the young is primarily by the male (Kuntal Das)

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration, and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivering brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out every day to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

Edited by Christie Craig, Campaign Manager

Wild Birds with a Splash of Colour

Originally posted 2018-03-02 18:37:46.

Translate »
Back
HAVE A QUICK QUESTION?

If so simply fill in our quick form and one of our team will contact you a.s.a.p

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Your Message
* Please add as many details as you can.

X
CONTACT US