Top 25: Wild Birds with Spectacular Catches

This week we are allowed a unique insight into the lives of birds that hunt. When we think of birds hunting, we typically picture a raptor with ferocious talons and a sharp beak to tear apart prey. But in fact many birds will hunt opportunistically. In this week’s Top 25 we feature a wide range of birds that have defeated the odds and have made a spectacular catch! We have bee-eaters, seabirds, hornbills, waders and, of course, the raptors. Thank you to everyone who contributed this week, your pictures bring the world of these birds to life for all of us

A Black Kite emerges victorious from a hunt! This spectacular catch took place at Sukhna Lake in India and was captured by Gur Simrat SinghThis Hamerkop is holding tight to its catch! In southern Africa frogs and tadpoles make up the main part of the Hamerkops’ diet (Judi Fenson)A juvenile Shikra overpowers a rather large bird! (Bhargavi Upadhya)An Oriental Pied Hornbill tosses back a lizard it has just caught (Lil’tography Lilian Sng)African Pygmy Falcons are Africa’s smallest raptor. But don’t let their size deceive you, they are excellent hunters! Here a female feasts on a mouse in Samburu National Reserve in Kenya (Sammy Mugo)The Anhinga hunts by submerging itself under water and using its sharp bill to spear fish and other prey. This ANHINGA IN Florida (USA) HAS GOT QUITE A BIG CATCH! (Vasu Karlapudi Photography)Studies show that Atlantic Puffins eat between 15 and 20 per cent of their body weight every day, this is mainly fish but also squids, crustaceans and polychaetes (Suranjan Mukherjee)Two Blue-tailed Bee-eaters compare their dragonfly catches (Manoj K Bind)Adult mayflies emerge all at once, often in enormous numbers, but they are very short lived, most die within 24 hours. So birds like this Common Grackle need to take full advantage as soon as the mayflies emerge (Zachary Vanier)A double catch by two Double-crested Cormorants (Leslie Reagan)A stunning action shot of a Great Cormorant catching a fish (Hitesh Chawla)This Great Hornbill has caught and killed a Jungle Owlet, this image shows how large these hornbills are. They stand at about 1 metre tall (Mainak Ray)Green Sandpipers feed mainly on invertebrates but when an opportunity for something larger comes by, why pass it up? (Indranil Bhattacharjee)Horned Grebes dive under water to catch fish. they are amazing swimmers, able to reach speeds of 1 metre per second in some cases (Christopher Ciccone)A spectacular shot of an Indian Roller with a mouse (Jasvir Faridkot)A Large-billed Crow bites the head of a frog to incapacitate it (Lil’tography Lilian Sng)A breath-taking action shot of an Osprey in Rutland, England (Edwin Godinho)here we have a Red-vented Bulbul with a mantid. From the size of the mantid’s abdomen, this is likely a female full of eggs, an excellent source of protein for this bulbul (Sandeep Beas)In many cases, the predator’s prey puts up a fight. Here a Red-tailed Hawk tries to gain control over a Kingsnake, tossing it in the air (Jack Zhi)A Shikra enjoys its well earned meal, in this case an Oriental Magpie-robin (Subham Chowdhury)Purple Swamphens eat mainly plant matter but they will take meat when they get the opportunity. This Purple Swamphen seems very pleased with its fish! (Bhargavi Upadhya)A White-eyed Buzzard enjoys its meal at Siruthavur Lake, India (Ananth Ramasamy)White-throated Kingfishers are typical ‘sit and wait’ predators, they will sit on a perch looking for prey and when they spot something they swoop down to catch it, in this case a lizard (Gur Simrat Singh)Sometimes when a raptor has caught prey, another bird will try steal it. Here a juvenile Black-winged Kite guards its prey from an adult (Brian Culver)A Great Cormorant tosses a fish that it has just caught in the Chennai backwaters, in India (Pallavi Sarkar)

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration, and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivering brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out every day to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

Edited by Christie Craig, Campaign Manager

Top 25 Bird Interactions

Originally posted 2018-07-20 20:38:19.

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week: Birds in Flight

Bird flight has sparked many people’s imaginations throughout history; inspiring artwork, and aircraft design. Thanks to special adaptations such as feathers, and hollow wing bones, most bird species are capable of flight. Due to the varying sizes and shapes of birds there are different styles of flying. Flapping is common but energy intensive, this flight is often alternated with gliding where horizontal air currents are used to move birds forward. Soaring flight makes use of vertical air currents and is used mainly by large birds, either using upward moving air currents against slopes such as cliffs; slope soaring, or by using pockets of air that are warmed on the ground and rise; thermal soaring.

Thank you to all the photographers that submitted birds in flight photos, your pictures can create awareness about the many birds that make use of flight, and the different styles that are used. Here we present the Top 25 photographs from this week’s theme.

Blue-winged parakeet flying overhead to land, photographed in Kerala, India (Kishore Bakshi)Indian river tern reflection, they are found near freshwater lakes, streams, and creeks, and feed on fish, frogs, crustaceans and aquatic insects (Unmesh Jadav)Marsh harriers hunt in open grasslands, wetlands, and farmlands for small mammals, birds, and insects (Mainak Ray)Long-billed vultures are native to India, Pakistan, and Nepal. Due to poisoning in the early 2000s their populations declined and they are listed as endangered by the IUCN, long term captive breeding programs have been set up to assist conservation of this species (Atanu Chakraborty)Pied kingfisher flying head first into the water after spotting a fish, their normal flight is rapid, and they are widely distributed across Africa and Asia (Vishesh-Kamboj)Great egrets are found in wetlands in Asia, Africa, the Americas, and southern Europe, they have a patch of facial skin that turns green during the breeding season (Harish Chopra)Western sandpipers breed in tundra in Siberia and Alaska, then migrate in large flocks to the coasts of North and South America, photographed here in California, USA (Barbara Wallace)White-bellied sea-eagle taking off with its catch which it will eat while flying, these birds fly using slow flaps and gliding (Partha Roy)This common cuckoo is a summer migrant to Europe and Asia, wintering in Africa, pictured here in Surrey, UK (Edwin Godinho)Bronze-winged jacanas, found in India and southeast Asia, have large feet and claws to allow them to walk on floating vegetation (Indranil Bhattacharjee)Laggar falcons are found on the Indian subcontinent, they are considered near threatened due to pesticide use, and as bait for larger falcons (Sandeep Beas)Black kites are found in open areas with access to water, and live in social groups (Vijay Singh Chandel)Greater flamingos are widespread omnivorous filter feeders; found in Africa, India, Middle East, and Europe, photographed here in Chennai, India (Anath Ramasamy)Low flying rosy-throated longclaw in Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya (Shantharam Holla)Roseate spoonbills are found in coastal Florida, Texas, and south west Louisiana in the USA, in marsh, lagoon, and mudflat habitats (J Bernardo Sanchez)Osprey coming in to land, in Louisiana, USA (Rhonda Lane)White-tailed kites are found in grasslands and marshes of North America, where they feed on rodents (Leslie Reagan)Spot-billed pelicans are found in inland coastal waters, and shallow, lowland forests, habitat loss and human disturbance have resulted in this species being listed as near threatened by the IUCN (Malini Shanmuganathan)Steppe eagle flying in Binsar India, these majestic birds are classified as endangered by the IUCN due to rapid population declines caused by habitat destruction and power line collisions (Preety Patel)Brahminy kites scavenge mainly dead fish and crabs, but will also hunt live prey (Partha Roy)Wire-tailed swallow landing from flight in Haryana, India, these birds are found in open country and near human habitation (Gur Simrat Singh)Pair of Eurasian spoonbills fly together in India, these wading birds live in shallow wetlands, and on muddy and clay beds (Anvita Paranjpe)Blue-winged parakeets are endemic to the western Ghats of India, and will screech while flying (Ramesh Aithal)Found throughout sub-saharan Africa, African fish-eagles are the national bird of four countries; Namibia, Zimbabwe, Zambia, and South Sudan (Vinayak Yardi)Dalmation pelicans are the largest members of the pelican family, and are considered near threatened due to wetland drainage and water pollution (Marios Mantzourogiannis)

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration, and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivering brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out every day to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

Edited by Laurie Johnson, Campaign Manager

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week: Birds with Yellow Plumage

Originally posted 2018-09-28 18:47:46.

Top 25 Wild Bird Brood Parasites

Brood parasites are an incredibly interesting group of birds. Instead of going to the trouble of building their own nests and raising their own young, they out-source these functions to other birds. They will lay their eggs in the nests of other breeding birds and allow them to raise their young on their behalf. They achieve this through a number of adaptations. Some species mimic the colour and shape of the host’s egg. Others have chicks with structures in their mouths which hyper stimulate the parents to feed them. The adult or chick parasite will also often kill the hosts’s chicks or remove the eggs in the nest, thus ensuring that the parasite survives. However hosts are not completely helpless to this attack, hosts have co-evolved behaviours such as abandoning a nest if it is parasitised. However some hosts are capable of raising both their own young and a parasite, without any visible cost.

Here we present 25 of best photographs of brood parasites, enjoy! If you would like to share your photographs with us, you can upload them to the Facebook page with species, location and photographer as the caption. We will announce next week’s theme this coming Sunday.

A female Asian Koel photographed in Bangalore, India. These birds commonly parasitise crows (Paneendra BA)The square-tailed Drongo-cuckoo of south east Asia parasitises babblers mainly, evicting the host’s eggs and young (Soumitra Ghosh)In India the Jacobin Cuckoo is believed to bring the monsoons, this is due to their arrival shortly before the rains begin (Vinayak Yardi)Common Hawk cuckoos parasitise babblers and laughingthrushes, as a result the fledglings call is very similar to that of a babbler (Paneendra BA)The Shiny Cowbird of South America is a generalist brood parasite, they have been recorded parasitising 240 different species (Raymond De Jesús Asencio)A female rufous morph Plaintive Cuckoo photographed in West Bengal, India (Subham Chowdhury)A rufous morph of the female Sunda Cuckoo. These cuckoos are only found on south east Asian islands, this one was photographed in Indonesia (Ananth Ramasamy)The Jacobin Cuckoo is found in India and sub-Saharan Africa. They parasitise various species of babblers across their range as well as bulbuls and fiscals in southern Africa (Dr. S. Alagu Ganesh)Female Brown-headed Cowbirds can lay up to 40 eggs in a season, damaging and removing the hosts eggs as she does (Jola Charlton)The Indian Cuckoo of India and south-east Asia parasitises drongos and shrikes (Mohit Ghatak)This Wood Duck is raising two of her own chicks as well as a Hooded Merganser chick (Teri Franzen)A Jungle Babbler feeds a Jacobin Cuckoo fledgling (Shaurya Shashwat Shukla)Black-billed Cuckoos are capable of building their own nests and raising young but they also occasionally lay in the nests of other birds (Owen Deutsch)Shiny Cowbird chicks do not mimic their host’s chicks but nonetheless their host provisions just as much for them as for their own chicks (Mann Niyati)Common Hawk-cuckoos are typically found in wooded areas, foraging in the tree tops (Radhakrishnan Sadasivam)A newly fledged Brown-headed Cowbird calls for its parents (Jola Charlton)A female Grey-bellied Cuckoo. These cuckoos usually parasitise Common Tailorbirds, the tailorbirds will abandon a parasitised clutch 20% of the time (Vishal Monakar)Male Pin-tailed Whydahs aggressively protect their territory, chasing away any other birds (Leslie Reagan)The colour of the Plaintive Cuckoos eggs depend on which host they use (Asutosh Pal)In India the Banded Bay Cuckoo parasitises the Common Iora (Panthera Tigris)An Asian Koel photographed at Hebbal Lake, India by Ravishankar PSeveral Chestnut-winged Cuckoos may be raised out of a single host’s nest, this would certainly place an additional burden on these parents (Subham Chowdhury)There are often massive size differences between parasitises and their hosts, such as this Common Cuckoo being fed by a Meadow Pipit in Ireland (Nigel Moore)A Common Hawk Cuckoo photographed in Sultanpur National Park, India (Vishal Monakar)On the third or fourth day after hatching, the Indian cuckoo chick pushes any other eggs and chicks out of the nest (Subham Chowdhury)

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration, and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivering brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out every day to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

Edited by Christie Craig, Campaign Manager

Wild Birds of the Night

Originally posted 2018-04-06 18:53:41.

Top 25 Bird Interactions

This week we asked the Wild Bird Revolution followers to capture interactions between birds, and we were not disappointed! This outstanding collection gives us unique insights into the many social interactions that birds have every day. Courtship, raising chicks, competition and fighting are just a few of the moments captured in this collection. Thank you to all who submitted photographs this week, your efforts allow us the privilege of capturing glimpses into the lives of these birds. For more updates you can follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Youtube.

An American Coot passes some food to its chick. These coots eat mainly aquatic vegetation but during the breeding season they rely more on insects and molluscs, the protein is important for the chicks’ development (Jack Zhi)A pair of Mute Swans captured in a soft light in Helsinki, Finland (Oana Badiu)A whole host of interesting social interactions occur between scavengers at a carcass. Here in the serengeti, a Marabou Stork waits for the White-backed and Lappet-faced Vultures to open the carcass, then he, being bigger than the vultures, swoops in to get his share (Edwin Godinho)A pair of King Penguins preen one another. King Penguins are monogamous for the breeding season, but on average only 29% of pairs will breed with the same mate the following year (Judi Fenson)Atlantic Puffins mate for life and return to the same site to breed. The pair will spend the winter apart at sea and then reunite for the breeding season. One of the ways the pair restores their bond is to rattle their bills together (Edwin Godinho)Smaller birds will often mob bigger birds of prey to chase them away. This action shot shows a Rufous Treepie mobbing an Oriental Honey Buzzard (Amit Kher)A male Great Hornbill brings food to his mate, who has enclosed herself in a tree cavity to breed. Male Great Hornbills are dutiful mates, he is solely responsible for feeding her and the chicks for the full 4 months that she is enclosed (Mainak Ray)You can just imagine what this White-cheeked Barbet is saying, “Get off my perch!” (Ganesh Rao)A male Oriental Pied Hornbills gives his mate a berry. gifts of food are often an integral part of courtship among birds (Suranjan Mukherjee)A Southern Yellow-billed Hornbill pair perched atop a thorn tree in Namibia. These hornbills have a strong pair bond, the male will bring the female food gifts for up to a month before they breed (Judi Fenson)A male Calliope Hummingbird displays his elaborate gorget feathers to a female he is courting (Tim Nicol)A trio of Barnacle Goslings hide in the protection of their mother’s wing. This moment was captured by Oana Badiu in Helsinki, FinlandA courtship ritual between two Black-legged Kittiwakes on a nesting ledge at the Bempton Cliffs in Yorkshire (Edwin Godinho)A Blue-Tailed Bee-eater brings a gift to his mate in Lahore, Pakistan (Tauseef Zafar)A Double-crested Cormorant fiercely defends his perch at Busse Lake, USA (Peter Chromik)A breath-taking aerial display between a male and female Northern Harrier. These displays are called sky-dances. The male will ‘dance’ while he is courting the female and then once they are paired they display together (Jack Zhi)female Greater Painted Snipes (left) initiate courtship with the male (right). Females may mate with multiple males and lay a clutch with each. each male will then incubate and care for their young, without help from the female (Owen Deutsch)A male House Finch displays proudly for a female, but she seems indifferent. female House Finches are not strictly monogamous, they may change partners between seasons or even within seasons if they find a preferable mate (Barbara Wallace)A tender moment between two Indian Silverbills grooming one another. Indian Silverbills are a gregarious species, occurring in flocks of up to 60 birds (Paneendra BA)A Red-billed Firefinch pair, photographed in Ethiopia. When courting the female, the male will present her with a feather and bob his head up and down (Goutam Mitra)Two Red-vented Bulbuls have a tussle over a perch (Bhargavi Upadhya)Food is exchanged between two Speckled Piculets (Amandeep Singh)A comical moment captured between two Spotted Owlets (Anvita Paranjpe)There is often fierce competition between scavengers at a carcass. Here two White-backed Vultures fight over a carcass in the Maasai Mara National Park in Kenya (Suranjan Mukherjee)This White-throated Laughingthrush parent looks like it has a busy job with these two hungry fledglings! (Shantharam Holla)

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration, and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivering brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out every day to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

Edited by Christie Craig, Campaign Manager

Top 25 Birds of Protected Areas

Originally posted 2018-07-14 01:25:57.

Top 25 Wild Birds Against Spectacular Landscapes

Wild Bird Trust presents this week’s Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs Against Spectacular Landscapes. We were truly blown away by the amazing landscape and habitat shots that were submitted this week!  Birds are excellent indicators of habitat quality, when habitats are degraded only the generalist and opportunistic species will remain in the area, others will move elsewhere. But when habitats are intact and undisturbed, specialist and sensitive species flourish and there will generally be a greater diversity of birds too. When we value birds and work to conserve them, these beautiful landscapes remain intact too!

To be in the running for next week’s Top 25 you can submit photographs on the Facebook page with species, location, and photographer as the caption. Also follow us on Twitter and Instagram for even more amazing bird photographs. If you would like to receive the Top 25 in your inbox every week, all you need to do is subscribe to our newsletter via our website!

American Kestrels perched alongside the Andes mountains of Ecuador (Melissa Penta)Bar-headed Geese eat a wide variety of aquatic vegetation, they are even able to eat plants that are considered poisonous, such as Lily of the Valley plants. This spectacular photograph was shot at the Tso Moriri lake in India (Ria Mukherjee)A pair of Common Cranes take flight on the arid plains of Little Rann of Kutch, India (Soumitra Ghosh)A study has shown that the diet of Eurasian Curlews differs between males and females. In France males were documented to eat crabs mostly and females preferred bivalves (Christian Bagnol)A Common Stonechat in Assam, India. These stonechats usually hunt insects from perches, frequently favouring one particular perch (Ashish Malhotra)A group of Greater Flamingoes take flight at sunset in Little Rann of Kutch, India (Rupa Mitra)A Greater Spotted Eagle photographed at the Al Khor Wildlife Sanctuary, UAE. These eagles are considered vulnerable to extinction mainly due to their wetland, forest and meadow habitat being degraded (Jobin J Valiyaparambil)A Grey Crowned Crane scans the landscape at Lake Victoria in Uganda (Elaine Henley)The Grey Heron is fairly common across Africa, and much of Eurasia, largely because they are able to use a wide variety of habitats, using any shallow waterbody available (Satyajit Ganguly)A Northern House Martin skims the water on a river in Scotland. These birds breed on buildings and rock faces in Europe and western Asia (David Main)A Common Kestrel scouts the landscape from atop a dune in the United Arab Emirates (Jobin J Valiyaparambil)The Black-rumped Flameback specialises in eating ants and are known to break into the nests of Weaver Ants- a type of ant that makes nests out of kitting together leaves (Anil Goyal)Red-crested Pochards in flight against the backdrop of the Himalayas (Anirban Roychowdhury)A Lilac-breasted Roller perched above the plains of the Maasai Mara, looking for prey (Ganesh Rao)A Little Egret flying over the Sea of Galilee in Israel. Contrary to what the name suggests, the sea of Galilee is a freshwater lake, ideal habitat for these egrets (John Parkinson)A Northern Pintail takes flight in Mangalajodi, India (Giridhar Vijay)A congregation of Northern Shovelers and Spot-billed Ducks in Pune, India (Anvita Paranjpe)A Common Ostrich photographed in Kenya by Ganesh Rao. In wetter areas these birds are quite sedentary but in arid areas they will move great distances to find food and waterA group of Painted Storks stands along the Chambal River, India (Ashok Appu)A Chukar Partridge photographed in Ladakh, India, these partridges are distributed across central Asia, they also have a thriving feral population on Robben Island, a small island off the coast of South Africa (Ria Mukherjee)Two Atlantic Puffins survey the landscape on Skomer Island, Wales (Suranjan Mukherjee)A Black-necked Stork photographed in the Kaziranga National Park, India. These birds prefer undisturbed wetland habitat, and protected areas like these are important for this species (Ahan Roy Chowdhury)A White stork crosses the skies against a magnificent backdrop of the mountains of the Sinai Desert, Egypt (Carlo Galliani)A White-fronted Chat on a beautifully lichened rock in Tasmania, Australia (Radhakrishnan Sadasivam)Eurasian Oystercatchers fly out to sea, off the coast of England. The population of Eurasian Oystercatchers is declining, largely because they have to compete with fishing vessels for food (Suranjan Mukherjee)

To be in the running for next week’s Top 25 you can submit photographs on the Facebook page with species, location, and photographer as the caption. Also follow us on Twitter and Instagram for even more amazing bird photographs. If you would like to receive the Top 25 in your inbox every week, all you need to do is subscribe to our newsletter via our website! 

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration, and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivering brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out every day to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

Edited by Christie Craig, Campaign Manager

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #124

Originally posted 2018-02-02 20:06:52.

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