Safety and speed

Led by WWF and its local partner ProDelphinus, the team worked jointly with local members of the 20 de Enero Community. Together, they were able to safely capture, study, and place transmitters on three male and one female dolphin.

With a little patience and a lot of care, citizens, guided by scientists, helped enclose dolphins with a fishing net and lead them onto stretchers outside of the water. From there, the examination process began, including blood and tissue sampling that will provide information about the dolphins’ health and diet. Finally, transmitters were placed on the dolphins and they were released back into the wild.

“We follow a strict protocol that prioritizes the welfare of the animals and its quick release back into the water, with the least possible discomfort,” says biologist Elizabeth Campbell, ProDelphinus Associate Researcher. “All the dolphins we tagged were safely released back into the river and we will now be able to see what they are doing on a daily basis, how they use their habitat, and even how climate change is impacting their home and behavior.”

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